Daily Archives: February 27, 2011

20+ Fantastic Female Fantasy Illustrations and Photomanipulations


20+ Fantastic Female Fantasy Illustrations and Photomanipulations

February 18th, 2011 Posted in Inspiration by Tara Hornor
Fantasy illustrations are a favorite for many, maybe because the imagination can really run wild in the creation process. Add a beautiful woman into the scene, and you have a stunning piece of art that speaks to nearly anyone. Damsels in distress, she-devils, dragon fighters — a woman can become nearly any character desired and viewers still recognize her femininity. This fantastic retention of the female form is exactly what the artists featured below accomplish.

If you are interested in more fantasy art inspiration, check out these posts:

 

Female Fantasy Illustrations

The following images are part of an inspiring collection of female fantasy illustrations on deshow.net. Browse through the other images on this site for some more beautiful art. All are free in this collection, so use them for posters, website art, on a postcard printing design, or simply as wallpaper for your desktop.

Brom Art

Check out some incredibly creative dark fantasy illustrations from Brom. The last two images below titled Sekeu and Lady of the Lake are from his novel A Child Thief, a frightening retelling of Peter Pan.

Yuehui Tang

The most eye-catching aspect of the beautiful girl in this illustration is her sorrowful, wistful expression. Her outfit and the swirl effects are also amazing.

Dan Dos Santos

Santos has an incredible portfolio, one that everyone should browse through. His realistic illustrations are very original and full of minute details, brilliant use of color, and life-like characters. All of the images below Santos designed for novels.

Sacha Diener

Much of Diener’s fantasy art depict women at war, but he also draws the occasional angelic female or damsel in distress. No matter the subject, his art is amazingly creative.

Andy Fairhurst

This very talented artist has a large gallery of fantasy paintings and illustrations that you really should check out. His use of color is inspiring, and his images are stunningly realistic.

Tara Hornor

Tara Hornor has a degree in English and writes about marketing, advertising, branding, graphic design, and desktop publishing. She works for PrintPlace.com, an online printing company that offers brochures, posters, postcard printingbusiness cards and more printed marketing media. In addition to her writing career, Tara also enjoys spending time with her husband and two children.Visit Authors WebsiteAll articles from this authour

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Gorgeous 3D Environments Created using e-on Vue


Gorgeous 3D Environments Created using e-on Vue

February 23rd, 2011 Posted in Inspiration by Alex Sawyer
e-on Vue is a computer graphics software package that is designed to emulate nature.  Used in a variety of feature films including Avatar and Pirates of the Caribbean, Vue is one of the most powerful environment creation softwares on the market today, perhaps rivaled in popularity only by Terragen.  Vue is a simple program to start using, but it takes significant skill, effort and knowledge to create realistic and inviting environments.  A careful study of nature and analysis of various lighting models, texturing methods, terrain development and other features is the true way to create digital nature.

In this post, you’ll find some gorgeous examples of Vue artworks, ranging from pure Vue environments to matte paintings with Vue as the base.  Vue is capable of creating anything imaginable, from cold mountains to steamy jungles, ocean depths and outer space scenes.

If you’re interested in more computer graphics inspiration, check out these posts:

Enjoy.

Snowy Peak by Alexm95

Untitled Volcanic Set by nukeation

Terraforming by Wasteland-3D

TerraNova by Max4Ever

Tropic by Alexm95

Welcome to Heaven by pavel89l

New World by Rich35211

The Tatooine Pinnacles by ExtremeProjects

Pace by nukeation

Vue Competition Entry by aksu

Gates to Elysium by tigaer

Ancient Temples by HardyGuardy

Summer Fields by ExtremeProjects

Cataclysm by BlPh

Wish You Were Here by priteeboy

Misty Morning by Brukhar

Vue 7 by nukeation

Rise and Shine by priteeboy

Terrain Mountain Final by 35211

Costa Rican Grotto by Extreme Projects

12mm of Truth by OPrwtos

Mountain View 8 by alexm95

Vue Architectural Visualization by naborghsoj08

Wish You Were Here by Tigaer

Sanctuary by Drea Horvath

Valis Licentia by Tigaer

Babylon Tower by Wasteland-3D

Desert View by Alexm95

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Introduction to Web Typography


Introduction to Web Typography

February 17th, 2011 Posted in Articles by Adriana Designioustimes
Typography is a vast field covering everything from text for print to web typography, and everything in between.  With all sorts of unique jargon such as kerning and serifs, it can be quite overwhelming to wrap your head around when initially jumping into the design field.  However, having a solid grasp of typography is important for any designer, whether you focus on the web, print or some other medium.

To be frank, on the Web, fonts can look seriously bad. There are a lot of variables regarding the way each of us see them and some limitations when it comes to what we could do about it. There are certain basic typographic rules all the web designer should pay attention to. You have to be very careful and yes, intelligent in order to use fonts in web design.

In this post, we’ll look at web typography and understand which fonts you should use and why.

 

If the fonts you see on the screen look horrible when you navigate the web, that may be only your fault. They’re too small? Blurry? The letters look straddled? Many of these details can be corrected from the user, and when you will fix your own screen, you will get a clue over the number of variables which other users have to manipulate and which will affect the aspect of the web pages you design.

Web is all about reading information, which means that our goal is to make the reading as easy as possible for the readers.

Readability or Legibility

First of all, let’s get things clear about readability and legibility, terms we assign to different things.

Readability refers to how easy it is to read a great deal of text, blocks of copy or whole pages of text. On pages that are covered only with text, the most intelligible is a serif font.

Serif, Readable

Legibility is a function of typeface design and refers to how easy it is for us to recognize short elements of text, like titles, buttons, pointers and so on or we can say that it is an informal measure of how easy it is to distinguish one letter from another in a particular typeface.

Sans Serif, Legible

Readability

There are a series of principles to respect that will guarantee more legible fonts plus a series of factors which make the fonts less legible. Even so, you don’t need to have the entire control over the fonts on a web page, because all these principles differ from the rules of print materials, tested along the time. You should carefully read the following info regarding fonts and their preset sizes within browsers, so that you will understand what you can and cannot control. When it comes to things that you actually can control, try following these principles:

–       In general, in print destined documents, we use serif fonts for large blocks of copy; on the screen though, the sans serif fonts are much easier to read. Choosing a font for a block of copy represents a concern only if you want a font to replace the one preset by the browser or if you create paragraphs or text as a graphic element in programs such as Photoshop. If not, let the visitor establish his own preset font – he will choose the one he is most custom with.

–       Don’t set the font too large – not larger than 14, for the block of text.

–       Don’t set the font too small – not under 10.

–       Never have a large amount of text exclusively in italics, uppercase or small caps and so on. Small parts of such formatting are perfect when necessary.

–       Avoid very long lines of text – never have the text stretch on all the length of the browser window. Long lines make the reading of the next text line on the screen much harder to find. Try to set the text in columns, or at least with bullets, instead of letting it flow over the whole page.

–       On the screen, shorter lines are better than long ones, although you should avoid very short lines of text. We read groups of words, not a word at a time, that’s why very short lines frequently interrupt the mental pattern.

–       Make sure there is enough contrast between the text and the background. The best contrast is between a black text on a white background; other combinations can be successful if there is sufficient contrast. Never put a red text over a bright yellow background or orange, pink and so on.

Legibility

Like in the case of readability, there are some main principles that make a font look more or less legible. Remember that these principles apply to short fragments of text: button labels, lists, pointers and so on.

–       In general, use sans serif fonts.

–       Avoid fonts like Antique Olive, where the superior parts of the letters (the small parts arising over the main body of the letter at letters like d, f or h) are only a bit taller than the body of the letter. This certain characteristic will make the distinction between “h” and “n” harder. Avoid fonts like Hobo, which don’t have inferior lengthening of the letter for p, j, q or other. Avoid fonts like Peignot, which mix uppercase with small caps. All of these make the words less legible, because you have to waste some extra time to decode. You should keep those fonts only for very special occasions and compensate for their lack of legibility.

–       Don’t use only uppercase, except you really need the rectangular aspect of a word written exclusively in upper case. A text written only in upper case is more difficult to read, because every word has the same rectangular shape. Examine the different shapes of the words up and down. We recognize these shapes when we read. But written only in upper case, UP and DOWN have the same shape. Pay attention.

Breaking the Rules

Like any rules, those too can be broken. Although you must know the rules before you can break them and you must have a clear reason for doing that. Do it consciously and after you analyzed it carefully. Compensate the rule. For example, a negative font (a bright colored font on a dark background) makes the text look smaller, but if you really want to use it, compensate by enlarging a little the font and by shortening the rows. If you really want to write the authors with a smaller font, don’t make them impossible to read, using cursive characters, a ridiculous font or very long rows.

To create an excellent aspect of the fonts in a website you must know the fonts in general.

Font Families of Font Faces

Serif Fonts – for example: Times New Roman, Garamond, Georgia; each glyph has some extra features which contribute to a better legibility in case of printing, especially with the strong contrast between the regular fonts and the thickened ones.

Sans Serif Fonts (“sans” being the French word for “without”) – for example: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana; the forms of the characters don’t include serifs and they don’t have any extra lengths, being indicated for the screen. They offer a less intense contrast between the regular font body and the aldines.

Cursive Fonts – they offer a representation of the letter body, suggesting handwriting or feather writing, the forms of the characters being partially or fully connected to each other. These type of fonts can become not legible for small sizes of the characters.

http://snippets-by-esther.blogspot.com/2009/12/first-post.html

Fantasy Fonts – for example: Critter, Cottonwood, Star Down – they can contain representations of the characters or other forms associated to each symbol (for example Webdings). You must use them with moderation.

Critter Font by Craig Frazier

http://blog.craftzine.com/archive/2008/05/critter_font_by_craig_frazier.html

Monospace Fonts – for example: Courier New, Prestige, Everson Mono – it has the property that each representation of a single character has the same height and width, unlike the previous families which had fonts proportionally spaced (for example, the letter “i” has the width smaller than the “m” in case of the letter body proportionally spaced). Because they suggest, with their shape, the typing machine, the fonts in this category are used to show fragments of source code in a programming language.

As you’ve probably guessed by reading so far, the most appropriate type of fonts to use in web pages is sans serif. Most of the websites use Arial or Helvetica.

Web Safe Fonts

Web-Safe fonts are fonts which are likely to be present on a wide range of computer systems. They are used by web content authors to increase the chances that the content will be displayed in the font they choose. Nevertheless, if it happens that a visitor to a website does not have that specified font, their browser will try to select a similar alternative, based on the author-specified generic families and fallback fonts.

You should choose font types that:

–       Fit the character of your site

–       Are widely available with many browsers and operating systems

–       Are easy to read on any computer screen.

Web-safe fonts for Windows

Serif

  • Bookman Old Style – web-safe for Windows 7
  • Cambria – web-safe for Windows Vista but not for Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Constantia – web-safe for Windows Vista but not for Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Times New Roman – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Georgia – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Garamond – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Palatino Linotype – this font is included in Windows 2000/XP
  • Book Antiqua – this font was bundled with Windows 98

Sans Serif

  • Andale Mono – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Arial – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Arial Black – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Calibri – web-safe for Windows Vista but not for Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Candara – web-safe for Windows Vista but not for Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Century Gothic – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Charcoal – Web-safe for Windows 7
  • Corbel – web-safe for Windows Vista but not for Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Impact – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Symbol
  • Tahoma – Web-safe for Windows 7
  • Trebuchet MS – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Verdana – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Webdings

Cursive

  • Comic Sans MS – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP

Monospace

  • Courier – web-safe for Windows 7
  • Courier New – web-safe for both Windows Vista and Windows 9x/2K/XP
  • Lucida Console – web-safe for Windows 7

Web-safe fonts for Mac

Serif

  • Bookman Old Style – web-safe for Mac OS X 10.5
  • Times New Roman – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Times – Web-safe for both Mac OS X and Mac Classic
  • Georgia – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Garamond – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • New York – These fonts are present in Mac OS X only if Classic is installed
  • Palatino

Sans Serif

  • Andale Mono – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Arial – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Arial Black – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Century Gothic – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Charcoal – Web-safe for Mac OS X 10.5
  • Geneva
  • Helvetica – Web-safe for both Mac OS X and Mac Classic
  • Impact – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Symbol
  • Tahoma – Web-safe for Mac OS X 10.5
  • Trebuchet MS – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Verdana – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Webdings

Cursive

  • Comic Sans MS – web-safe for Mac OS X.

Monospace

  • Courier New – Web-safe for Mac OS X; not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Mac Classic
  • Courier – Web-safe for both Mac OS X and Mac Classic
  • Lucida Console – Web-safe for Mac OS X 10.5

Web-safe fonts for Linux Unix

Serif

  • Times New Roman – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Times
  • Georgia – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Garamond – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix

Sans Serif

  • Andale Mono – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Arial – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Arial Black – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Century Gothic – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Helvetica
  • Impact – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Trebuchet MS – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Verdana – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix

Cursive

  • Comic Sans MS – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix

Monospace

  • Courier New – not so common but generally accepted as web safe for Linux Unix
  • Courier

It’s important to take in consideration the fonts listed above when creating content for your website. Nevertheless, you should include fall back fonts to ensure that user are experiencing the same look. Doing this will ensure that fonts are close enough to avoid any experiences like when the website is damaged due to the usage of a particular font and it is unavailable at the user’s end.

Being a web designer, it’s very important to know which are the web safe fonts. Sometimes, users might not be able to see the content on your website because of the font you used. Using the right typeface is crucial because it influences the way visitors perceive your website/business. In conclusion, it’s important to use fonts which are readable, are appropriate for the character of your website and, most important, are compatible with a wide range of computers.

Adriana Designioustimes

Adriana Marinica is a 24 young blogger, design enthusiast and author. She writes and handles the PR for Designious.comDesignioustimes.com and Vectorious.net.Visit Authors WebsiteAll articles from this authour

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24 Captivating Digital Painting Tutorials


ARTICLES OF THE HUMANITY PHOTO AWARDS 2011


ARTICLES OF THE HUMANITY PHOTO AWARDS 2011

2010-09-16 17:25:10 by:Admin


ARTICLES OF THE HUMANITY PHOTO AWARDS 2011
Mission
To call upon responsible photographers who respect and love life to take their cameras, in the context of stories/portfolios:
To explore and rescue the endangered folk cultures of all the world’s nationalities by means of photography; to profoundly record the changes and evolution of various folk cultures in a genuine and vivid form;
To record, spread and share the multi-cultures of the world to enhance mutual understanding and exchanges of human beings and to promote the world peace and development;
To contribute to the World Folklore Photo Museum with world culture records.
Organized by
THE CHINA FOLKLORE PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION (CFPA)
The UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
On-line Submission
Entries can only be submitted on-line.
Entrants must register on the website http://hpa2011.worldfpa.org and submit entries in accordance with relevant requirements.
Every entrant can choose different categories and is allowed to submitted no more than 3 entries. Stories/Portfolios entered must contain no less than 8 and no more than 12 images.
Personal information as well as images could be modified or replaced (registered e-mail excepted) during entry period.
Schedule
Entry Period: September 16th, 2010—April 15th, 2011(Beijing Time)
Selection: By mid August, 2011, candidate works for the Nomination Awards and the Grand Awards of each category will be announced after two rounds of evaluation. On September 14th and 15th, 2011, the final evaluation will unveil the Grand Awards of the six categories. The results will be published by stages on the above mentioned website.
Award Ceremony: September 16th, 2011. Humanity Photo Grand Awards Jury’s Special Awards will be announced on the day of Award Ceremony. and
Premiere Exhibition: The premiere exhibition of the HPA 2011 –Memories of Mankind VII, which consists all the prized works (works win the Nomination Awards and the higher ones), will be held together with the final selection and the award ceremony at the same place and in the same period. Some of the prize-winning photographers may have their individual folklore photograph exhibitions at the same period.
Categories
The contest is based on picture stories/portfolios of between 8 to 12 images. Please enter into the following categories:
Portrait & Costume
Portraits of people from different nationalities; costumes and adornments featuring diverse ethnic cultures, including everyday dress, ceremonial dress, hats and shoes, adornments and hairstyle, etc; the make of costumes and adornments; distinctive attire customs such as dressing etiquette and taboos and so on.
Architecture
Traditional dwellings, public facilities, special architecture (e.g. religious buildings) in terms of the construction process, structure, interior layout and furniture adornments of all kinds; the influence of the surroundings reflected on features of the local architecture; dwelling habits of different ethnic groups.
Living and Production Custom
The traditional ways of production and life, including everyday work, such as fishing, hunting, farming, forestry, animal husbandry, handicrafts industry, etc; business trade and transportation; living habits and ways of dieting as well as food making; comprehensive life customs in series, of a specific region, of a nationality or a tribe.
Festivities
Annual and seasonal festivals; festivals on production and recreation, religious ceremonies, temple fairs and other traditional folk activities
Education, Recreation, Sports & Technology
Education, traditional ecology, folk science and technology, folk medicine and sanitation, folk crafts, traditional sports and recreational activities, and local dramas, etc.
Traditional Rites
Including birth, adult rite, wedding, funeral, taboo, worship, morality, respect for the old people, traditional etiquette, and traditional ceremony for individual, family, village or ethnic group, and religious rites.
Awards
Humanity Photo Grand Awards: 6 (one for each category)
Judging Criteria: The final prized work will be selected according to a comprehensive evaluation of itsphotographic technique, documentary value and the difficulty in photographing and can best reveal the mission of the HPA contest.
Prizes: a prize of US$2000; an award certificate;a book/CD-photo collection of the HPA 2011;an invitation to attend the award ceremony and the opening ceremony of the premiere exhibition of “Memories of Mankind VII”;transportation fee and a 3-9 days hotel accommodation;prized works to be put on the premiere exhibition
Humanity Photo Documentary Awards: 60
Prizes: an award certificate; a book/CD-photo collection of the HPA 2011; an invitation to attend the award ceremony and the opening ceremony of the premiere exhibition of “Memories of Mankind VII”; transportation fee and a 3-9 days hotel accommodation; prized works to be put on the premiere exhibition
In addition, photographs of Humanity Photo Documentary Awards will have the opportunities to winJury’s Special Awards, including Detail-Focus Award, Best Story Award, Interview Skills Award, Photo Editing Award, Best Photo and Text Award, and Persevering Tracing Award. Each winner will receive photographic equipment or product which is equivalent to US$500.

 

Humanity Photo Nomination Awards: 100
Prizes: an award certificate; a book/CD-photo collection of the HPA 2011; an invitation to attend the award ceremony and the opening ceremony of the premiere exhibition of “Memories of Mankind VII”; a 3-9 days hotel accommodation; prized works to be put on the premiere exhibition
All the participants except the winners for Grand Awards, Documentary Awards and Nomination Awards will get Commemoration Certificates of the HPA 2011 officially stamped by the two organizers—the CFPA and the UNESCO and be invited to attend the award ceremony and the opening ceremony of the premiere exhibition. (Travel and accommodation expense will be at his/her own.) For those who are not able to attend the ceremony, the CFPA will provide electronic commemoration certificates for them to download and mail on request a book/CD-photo collection of the HPA 2011 contest at a discount charge.
Entry Rules (Please read carefully.)
Entrants
1.       All entries should be submitted on-line. Please register on the websitehttp://hpa2011.worldfpa.org, and submit images through this website.
2.       There are no restrictions on participants in terms of profession, gender, age, nationality, country and region.
3.       The images must be taken by the entrant him/ herself, otherwise the entrant will be deprived of the right to win the prizes in the contest.
4.       Images entered jointly by two or more than two participants will not be accepted.
5.       Please use only Chinese or English to fill in Entry Form. The entrant’s name in Entry Form should be in accordance with that in his/her valid identity certificate.
6.       All entrants will be regarded as those who accept the Articles of the HPA 2011. Any legal responsibility relating to entries, such as copyright, right of reputation and portrait, right of privacy, right of trade mark, etc. will be borne by the entrants.
7.       The contest is open to everyone except the members of the jury and staff of HPA 2011 Organizing Committee.
Candidate Works
8.       Photographs that have won prizes in previous HPA contests are excluded from the HPA 2011, other works are free to enter.
9.      There are no restrictions on the entries’ contents, e.g. country or nationality. (Entries can contain several ethnic groups in one country or one nationality living in different countries.)
10.   There is no time limit as to when the entries were taken. They can be taken on one occasion or over a period of time.
11.   Please specify the category that you would like the entry to be entered. The Organizer and judges are not responsible to re-categorize any entry.
12.   Stories/Portfolios should consist of a minimum of 8 and a maximum of 12 images. Each entrant is allowed to submitted no more than 3 entries.
13.   Images must be uploaded as .jpg format and at least 2,500 pixels in short side.
14.   Only retouching which doesn’t alter the content of the image is allowed. All entries are prohibited from synthesis, addition, deletion and greatly color changes. Images with added borders, backgrounds or other effects will not beaccepted. To keep the records authentic, composite or splicing images and trick photographs will not be judged.
15.   Each entry should contain caption that truly depicts the content of the photos.
Declaration of the Organizer
16.   No entry fee for this contest.
17.   To guarantee the fairness of the HPA 2011, personal information should not be shown on any place of the photo nor the caption text. Otherwise the entry will not be judged.
18.   The Organizer has the right to repeatedly use entries submitted for the contest in related non-commercial activities, including publications, exhibitions, TV programs, internet, electronic media, etc. and without remuneration to the entrants and the Organizer reserve the right to do probable editing of the entries.
19.   Entries must have been submitted by April 15th, 2011 at the appointed website. (The date when the works are completely submitted is the deemed arrival date.)
20.   CFPA reserves the right of final interpretation of this contest.
Contact Information
CHINA FOLKLORE PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION (CFPA)
Address: Room 315, North Building, No.1 Liupukang Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100120, China.
Tel.: +86 10 62252175
Fax: +86 10 62252175